No clock



  • Currently the Turbo Arrow is NOT equipped for instrument flight in the U.S.!

    FAR 91.205(d)
    "Instrument flight rules. For IFR flight, the following instruments and equipment are required:
    (1) Instruments and equipment specified in paragraph (b) of this section, and, for night flight, instruments and equipment specified in paragraph (c) of this section.
    (2) Two-way radio communication and navigation equipment suitable for the route to be flown.
    (3) Gyroscopic rate-of-turn indicator, except on the following aircraft:
    (i) Airplanes with a third attitude instrument system usable through flight attitudes of 360 degrees of pitch and roll and installed in accordance with the instrument requirements prescribed in § 121.305(j) of this chapter; and
    (ii) Rotorcraft with a third attitude instrument system usable through flight attitudes of ±80 degrees of pitch and ±120 degrees of roll and installed in accordance with § 29.1303(g) of this chapter.
    (4) Slip-skid indicator.
    (5) Sensitive altimeter adjustable for barometric pressure.
    (6) A clock displaying hours, minutes, and seconds with a sweep-second pointer or digital presentation.
    (7) Generator or alternator of adequate capacity.
    (8) Gyroscopic pitch and bank indicator (artificial horizon).
    (9) Gyroscopic direction indicator (directional gyro or equivalent)."

    The issue is the aircraft should not be equipped with a back-up altimeter. In most installations the clock is where the gyro suction gauge is located and the gyro suction gauge is where the (unnecessary) 2nd altimeter is.

    For example: alt text

    I hope this can be rectified so I can fly /A IFR again.



  • @crow, Isn't there a clock on the Pilot's yoke?

    Also, I don't think there are any "unnecessary" backup instruments, especially for flight in IMC... I have recently seen several highly educational accident report videos on YouTube about fatal crashes resulting from instrument failures during IMC. Failure of the vacumn pump seems to be quite common, which results in the loss of all gyro driven instruments including the artificial horizon and heading indicators, making IFR flight extremely challenging!



  • Hmm, honestly I turn the yokes off so that might be my issue. However, the arrow only has one static system. Barring a nearly impossible failure of the mechanics inside the altimeter the most likely cause of failure will be the static lines/ports which will fail all of the altimeters in the aircraft. A backup doesn't really do you any good unless you have a completely redundant static system.